In the language of diabetes, GI is short for Glycemic Index.

The glycemic index, or GI, measures how a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood glucose. Foods are ranked based on how they compare to a reference food — either glucose or white bread.
A food with a high GI raises blood glucose more than a food with a medium or low GI.
Meal planning with the GI involves choosing foods that have a low or medium GI. If eating a food with a high GI, you can combine it with low GI foods to help balance the meal.

Read more at Glycemic Index and Diabetes from the American Diabetes Association.

Some foods can make your blood sugar shoot up very fast. That’s because carbohydrates like refined sugars and bread are easier for your body to change into glucose, the sugar your body uses for energy, than more slowly digested carbs like those in vegetables and whole grains. Eat a lot of those easy carbohydrates and you’ll have a hard time controlling your blood sugar, even with insulin and diabetes medications.
The glycemic index gives you a way to tell slower-acting “good carbs” from the faster “bad carbs.” You can use it to fine-tune your carb-counting and help keep your blood sugar more steady.

Read more at How to Use the Glycemic Index from WebMD.

You may learn much more from “the ‘home of the glycemic index’ – the official website for the glycemic index and international GI database which is based in the Human Nutrition Unit, School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney. The website is updated and maintained by the University’s GI Group …”

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About Roland Louis Hansen

I have been: an organization development consultant; a college-level instructor of political science, psychology, and sociology; a public administrator; a social worker; an elected official; a political operative; a community activist; a union official; a shoe salesman and manager, a factory worker; a fast food restaurant employee; and, a custodian.
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